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Disability Access & Inclusion Plan

Access and inclusion for people with disabilities

Disability affects one third of all Western Australians
It is estimated that 405,500 Western Australians have a disability (20.6 per cent of the total population). An estimated 246,800 Western Australians are carers for people with disabilities (12.6 per cent of the total population). Between 2006 and 2026 the number of people with disabilities in Western Australia is expected to increase by more than 210,000 due mainly to our ageing population.

While the degree and type of disability varies with individual circumstances, people with disabilities frequently face barriers with everyday activities such as climbing stairs, hearing or understanding what is said, reading small print, or understanding signs.

Access and inclusion is about ensuring that all public services, facilities and information are available to all community members, including those who have a disability, so that they have the opportunity and choice to participate in all aspects of community life.

The six outcomes of a Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
Schedule 3 of the Disability Services Regulations 2004 lists six desired outcomes of DAIPs.

  1. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access services of and events organised by a public authority.

  2. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access buildings and other facilities of a public authority.

  3. People with disabilities receive information in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

  4. People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of a public authority as other people receive from the staff of that public authority.

  5. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to a public authority.

  6. People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by a public authority.

 

Background to Disability Access and Inclusion Plans
People with disabilities and their families and carers have the same rights as other people to access services within the community. These rights are built into State and Commonwealth legislation. It is unlawful to discriminate against a person with a disability.

The Disability Services Act (1993) was amended in 2004 and requires State Government agencies and Local Governments to develop and implement Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs).

Section 29B of the Act states “a public authority that has a disability access and inclusion plan must take all practicable measures to ensure that the plan is implemented by the public authority and its officers, employees, agents or contractors”.

The Act requires DAIPs to be implemented by agents and contractors as well as the staff of a public authority. Where agents and contractors provide services to the public on behalf of the contracting public authority, these services are to be conducted consistent with the DAIP of the contracting public authority.

DAIPs provide a focus on access to services provided by public authorities, and their relevant agents and contractors to increase independence, opportunities and inclusion for people with disabilities within the community.

What this means for agents and contractors
The Act requires DAIPs to be implemented by staff as well as agents and contractors. Services to the public provided by agents and contractors are to be conducted consistent with the six desired outcomes in the DAIP of the contracting authority.

Agents and contractors will be expected to report to the contracting agency annually on their progress in achieving the desired outcomes. Click here to view GSGPN Amity Health Contractor Report for July 2015 to June 2016.